Five things to read on a flight

Text: Annikky Lamp Photos: Marin Sild, freestocks.org Published: 19/ Jan/ 2018

Annikky Lamp (37) is a stylish and talented lifestyle blogger working in Brussels as a speaker of the Estonia's EU Presidency, and she travels quite a bit. When she has time, Annikky's writes an inspirational lifestyle blog lifeinacoldclimate.com. Because of this she easily combines travelling and reading.

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# 1 Kindle

My first suggestion for reading on a trip is always the same: e-reading. It's very romantic, but terribly annoying, to bring ten books on a holiday. The digital reading tablet is small, lightweight and full of books. Read what you want and where you want.

# 2 Tim Marshall's "Prisoners of Geography"

Reading on the aeroplane is not necessarily easy: everything is brought to you or taken away all the time, coffee and onboard shopping are offered. For many, it's easier to read a magazine, rather than a novel. “Prisoners of Geography” is an intriguing and easy-to-read view of how geography shapes societies and policies.

Nothing makes a book fanatic more happy than a long flight: hours of reading time!

# 3 Jean-Pierre Minaudier's "Grammar Worship

A book about grammar does not sound very promising, but this piece of reader-friendly work is full of beautiful facts and thought-provoking ideas. In addition, it's always nice when the author is truly fascinated by the subject. It's a charming book and also is connected to Estonia.

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# 4 Neil Gaiman's "American Gods"

Nothing makes a book fanatic more happy than a long flight: hours of reading time! Probably Gaiman's most well-known fantasy novel about the new and old gods of America, and despite being more than 600 pages, it makes for fascinating and unique reading. Watching the TV-show is too boring.

# 5 Magazines

If reading a book requires too much effort and concentration, there are always magazines. It's easier to concentrate on a short article, and the flight attendants can offer coffee as often as they want. I usually buy one more serious and one lighter read for a flight. My experience is that people don't judge you as much if you have The Economist lying next to your issue of Vogue. For a more refined taste, The Gentlewoman and The New Yorker are always safe bets.

Article was published in Nordica´s in-flight magazine Time Flies  (autumn 2017).